13 Replies Latest reply on Apr 19, 2013 9:11 AM by BooksOnTheKnob

    Price of Books

      Before I purchased my Nook, I did quite a bit of research. The kindle at the time was to pricey. The sony e-reader wasn't acceptable.

       

      I went to purchase a new Nook Book yesterday and am really ticked off about the price. Hardcover price: 15.39

              Nook price: 14.99

        SAVINGS????:     .40

       

      I might as well purchase the hardcover. At least I can re-sell that.

       

        • Re: Price of Books
          bklvr896

           


          jmory wrote:

          Before I purchased my Nook, I did quite a bit of research. The kindle at the time was to pricey. The sony e-reader wasn't acceptable.

           

          I went to purchase a new Nook Book yesterday and am really ticked off about the price. Hardcover price: 15.39

                  Nook price: 14.99

            SAVINGS????:     .40

           

          I might as well purchase the hardcover. At least I can re-sell that.

           


          At this time, the publisher's are controlling the prices for 5 of the 6 major publishers.  Which means, B&N can't lower the price, they can't discount it, they can't offer coupons.  I don't know what book you are looking at, but that's the issue, although sometimes B&N does price the books oddly.  You can check inkmesh or addall ot see if somewhere else is selling it for cheaper, but, depending on the publisher, it will be the same price everywhere.

          There are literally hundreds of discussions on this on these boards if you're interested in more information.

           

          • Re: Price of Books
            Doug_Pardee

            What bklvr896 said.

             

            I'd also add that most of the time, $14.99 is the price for those people who absolutely must have the e-book as soon as it comes out. For most novels, the price drops to $12.99 within a week or two, after the early sales rush ends. After some number of months, many e-book novels drop to $9.99 (and many don't).

             

            A little patience will save you some money. But really, an e-reader is about convenience rather than cost savings.

             

            • Re: Price of Books

               


              jmory wrote:

              Before I purchased my Nook, I did quite a bit of research. The kindle at the time was to pricey. The sony e-reader wasn't acceptable.

               

              I went to purchase a new Nook Book yesterday and am really ticked off about the price. Hardcover price: 15.39

                      Nook price: 14.99

                SAVINGS????:     .40

               

              I might as well purchase the hardcover. At least I can re-sell that.

               


              Do you normally re-sell alot of your current books?  I only ask because I've never sold any of mine nor have I ever had the desire to sell any of my books.

               

              • Re: Price of Books

                As a children's book author and developer I can understand the frustration for people who feel they are spending too much for an electronic book. It's true that the big five are controlling the prices of their ebooks. How can they justify it?

                 

                Programming costs, Tech support costs, testing costs, marketing through new channels...these are just a few new costs that publishers didn't need to worry about in the past. Granted there are no printer costs, but the new costs may or may not equal that of the traditional methods of publishing. The savings in paper costs alone should warrant a lower price, but there are costs that come into play such as hiring a programmer, extensive testing. Believe me, I know this first hand. I currently have a book pending publication that I have tried to upload to the Nook. It's frustrating to say the least. Yet I've priced my books no more than $2.99. I have to absorb the cost to let people know I'm out there. 

                 

                As an indie producer, we can control costs and produce just as good quality at a much lower cost to customers. I now have two books on the Nook store (Easter Bunny, and Stuffed Books: Holiday Fun Book) and love that people are downloading my books; even though they are not in season. I'm a small publisher with a small portfolio of books to choose from, but by supporting smaller epublishing houses, you'll be able to put pressure on the big boys.

                 

                Feel free to email me with any questions you have. I love feedback.

                • Re: Price of Books
                  compulsivereaderTX

                  Ebooks are generally priced in tandom with their printed versions. If the book just came out in hardcover, the ebook is going to be priced accordingly (high too) but generally a LOT less than the hardcover version. After awhile, the price comes down, same as it does for the printed version. Some people don't care, they pay the price because they WANT that (e)book. Those who have to consider price, wait for the price to come down to what they feel they are willing to pay. Some of the publishers dictate the price that the sellers can charge. That means that B&N can't discount those books or put them "on sale". Ever. And that doesn't matter whichever Ereader that you bought. It's a publisher demand that all ebook sellers have to comply with or they can't sell the ebook.

                   

                  On the plus side:

                  There ARE tons of VERY GOOD books that are priced more reasonably. You may not recognize the author, etc...but reading the reviews, checking ratings, you should be able to find lots of wonderful ebooks that you will love a lot more reasonably priced, maybe even as low as 99 cents. I refuse to pay over 9.99 for an ebook but have not found myself lacking in low cost or even free reading material. I just had to relegate my previous favorite authors to the "get it from the library" list. :smileyhappy:

                  • Re: Price of Books

                    I am currently composing a proposal project for my advanced composition class at the UofA.  For my proposal I suggested that Barnes and Noble members should have the ability to trade in they're old used books at their local store for an e-book copy of said book free of charge.  I know that I personally don't like carrying three or four books around when I travel.  What are your thoughts on this idea? Do you think it would work, why or why not?

                      • Re: Price of Books
                        Nevermore1
                        Unfortunately that wouldn't work (though it would be nice if it did). The main problem would be that BN would lose money as they would not be able to re-sell the used books and there isn't a simple way to control where the DTB books came from. Someone could go to a used bookstore and purchase a book for .50 then go to BN to "trade" it for the e-book copy.
                        • Re: Price of Books
                          bklvr896

                          SterlingArcher wrote:

                          I am currently composing a proposal project for my advanced composition class at the UofA.  For my proposal I suggested that Barnes and Noble members should have the ability to trade in they're old used books at their local store for an e-book copy of said book free of charge.  I know that I personally don't like carrying three or four books around when I travel.  What are your thoughts on this idea? Do you think it would work, why or why not?


                          This has been brought up several times before, there are discussions on it, if you care to search.

                           

                          I don't think it would work or is feasible.  One, what would BN do with all those used books?

                           

                          But the bigger issue is, that BN doesn't get those ebooks for free, they have to pay for each one.  So if I bring in 20 paperbacks and, let's just say they retail for $10.00 and BN paid $5.00 for book.  You're asking BN to give you $100 out of pocket because they would have to pay the publisher $5 each for the books they just gave to you.  Mulitiply that thousands of times over, and they'd be out of business really quick.

                           

                          Now, the publishers on the otherhand, I suppose they could sponser something like this, but they might still be putting money out of pocket depending on how the contract with the author is written.  They may still have to pay the author even if they give the ebook away in exchange for a paperback.

                            • Re: Price of Books
                              keriflur

                              Unless B&N becomes a charity, this is never going to happen.  B&N has to pay for those ebooks, so why should they give them to you for free?  Ebook format is just another format, like hardcover or paperback.  You wouldn't walk into B&N with your used paperback and ask them for a brand new hardcover, would you?

                               

                               

                            • Re: Price of Books
                              NookGardener

                              SterlingArcher wrote:

                              I am currently composing a proposal project for my advanced composition class at the UofA.  For my proposal I suggested that Barnes and Noble members should have the ability to trade in they're old used books at their local store for an e-book copy of said book free of charge.  I know that I personally don't like carrying three or four books around when I travel.  What are your thoughts on this idea? Do you think it would work, why or why not?


                              It's YOUR proposal.  Why dont you tell us why you think it will work.

                              • Re: Price of Books
                                RHWright

                                SterlingArcher wrote:

                                I am currently composing a proposal project for my advanced composition class at the UofA.  For my proposal I suggested that Barnes and Noble members should have the ability to trade in they're old used books at their local store for an e-book copy of said book free of charge.  I know that I personally don't like carrying three or four books around when I travel.  What are your thoughts on this idea? Do you think it would work, why or why not?


                                Unless B&N wants to get into the used book business, this would never work.

                                 

                                Even then, it would not be financially feasible on a "trade in for a free copy" basis. At best, they could give 10-25% of cover price towards the purchase of ebooks.

                                 

                                And given market conditions, I don't think it would be wise for B&N to directly play in the used book game. There's just too little profit in it.

                                 

                                What I would like to see B&N do is a permanent ereader trade-in policy. Nook, Kindle, ipad, whatever. You trade it in, you get credit towards purchasing a new NOOK. I know they've run it as a promo in the past, but it should be a permanent policy (though the credit for old readers might fluctuate based on the market for the device and whether it is in working condition).

                                 

                                  • Re: Price of Books
                                    keriflur

                                    Some B&Ns do sell used books, but they do so for a profit, not for goodwill.

                                    • Re: Price of Books
                                      BooksOnTheKnob

                                      Our local Books-a-Million is doing just this - bring in any working ereader and they'll buy it (they are also buying used books).  No idea what they are going to do with any of them.

                                       

                                      Since they sell the nook there, you can then take that money and buy a nook, essentially trading in (too bad they stopped selling Kobo readers - I'd love to see the new Aura HD and see if the larger screen is worth an upgrade).