5 Replies Latest reply on Oct 24, 2013 2:27 PM by brint3

    New Yorker issues and customer service

      A few weeks ago, the format on my New Yorker on the Nook changed. It went from one that offered very nice bells and whistles, audio and visual extras, to one that is no more than a clunky xerox of the hard copy. I have called both the New Yorker and Barnes and Noble and here is what I have learned.

       

      First, this is not a New Yorker problem. They tell me that they release one version of the electronic magazine and the soft ware is the responsibility of the company with the e-reader. And if I read the new Yorker on my I-phone, it still has all the bells and whistles. So this is not an issue with the New Yorker.

       

      Second, Barnes and Noble had been completely unhelpful. I have already seen the comments on the blogs suggesting that this is not their issue. That is wrong.

       

      But when I spoken to Barnes and Noble, they will do nothing to help find a solution. I have spent hours on the phone, most of that time on hold. They will not connect me with anyone who will accept responsibility for the software for the new Yorker on the Nook. They tell me someone will call me. I get no call back.

       

      This level of customer support is abysmal. I am beyond frustrated. If I cannot get this issue solved, and it had now been going on for a month, I will leave this Nook for another e-reader which allows me to get the magazine with the current technology.

        • Re: New Yorker issues and customer service
          AlbionRose

          I'm sorry you have had such a bad experience with this.

           

          I don't read magazines on my Nook, but as a work around is there an app you could download from the play store and use that to read your New Yorker?  From what you say it sounds like an issue with the B&N reader app, and it may not be the same with say Google Magazine or Moon+ reader.

           

          As for customer services, I know that when I have needed to chase items up with them, I have to ask to speak to the person's Manager or Superivsor to get past the person who only has a script to someone with actual technical knowledge.  It can also help if you ask for a reference number - that seems to create a record of your call and mean that they will pass you on to the technical guys more quickly when you call back. But it does take an awful lot of time to get there!

          • Re: New Yorker issues and customer service

            I finally got a response from the New Yorker Customer Service. This is what they told me.

             

            "Dear Subscriber:

            We apologize for the inconvenience this has caused.

            The New Yorker app through Barnes & Noble on the Nook will now be a 
            "replica" edition of the print magazine.  It will have a reader view 
            where full-size text is viewable.  

            The primary technical reason for the change is that the software 
            required to run our apps through Barnes & Noble is no longer available.



            If you should need further assistance, please be sure to include all 
            previous e-mail correspondence.

            Thank you for contacting The New Yorker Digital Reader Subscriber 
            Support.

            Sincerely,

            Kari"


            Can anyone explain what this means? What software? Is it controlled by Barnes and Noble? By the New Yorker? By a third party? Why is it no longer available?

             

            If you understand what this means, I'd appreciate help in translating this. Me I see this as further evidence that the Nook is no longer going to be supported by vendors and the device is in decline. I would love to be wrong. But...

             

             

              • Re: New Yorker issues and customer service
                roustabout

                This is what I was driving toward when I explained that how the magazine is delivered is partly in the hands of BN and partly in the hands of the publisher.  In this case, the publisher has discontinued the enhanced edition for Nooks.

                 

                BN probably had a 2 or 3 year contract with the New Yorker for the enhanced Nook edition, and the New Yorker didn't want to renew it - my memory is that the color variant's only been available for a couple of years.

                 

                Ah - the enhanced edition was done at the time of the release of the Nook Tablet (2 years ago.)  This may actually be more evidence that the LCD nook devices are not being either refreshed or continuing in production.  I expect the change will ultimately affect more Conde Nast titles, as apparently they were all produced in similar fashion. 

                 

                http://www.minonline.com/news/New-Yorker-Gets-Nooked_19668.html

                 

                When I looked carefully at the New Yorker files on the HD and Tablet they were complex files -  designed to be used in the BN magazine viewer.  They were separate Adobe layouts for the different screen sizes. 

                 

                This was the basis of my statement earlier that for BN and Amazon I could think of at least 6 different files that needed to be distributed out to Nook and Kindle devices - I also knew that on occasion the files were getting sent to the wrong devices.  But the complexity of the different variants implied that getting that many layouts going was probably costly for the New Yorker in terms of staffing. 

                 

                Since the Play store is available now on the Nooks, they may be in better shape for the enhanced New Yorker than the Amazon devices are (or the New Yorker may continue the special arrangement with Amazon even after discontinuing it for BN) - unsubscribe from the Nook edition and subscribe to the Play edition if you like.

                 

                Honestly, my preference is for the monochrome nook edition in vanilla epub format.  Those files are easy to put on my other devices to read when traveling, etc. and only run about 5 megabytes apiece - the enhanced New Yorkers were chewing up 200 meg a copy at times.