4 Replies Latest reply on Mar 30, 2011 10:31 AM by Doug_Pardee

    Price of eBooks vs. paperback

      I understand that when a new hardcover is published that the eBook version costs considerably less.  However why is it when the book goes to paperback that the e-version is not reduced also? Lately it seems cheaper to buy off the shelf.

        • Re: Price of eBooks vs. paperback
          gobasso

          This problem has been discussed quite a bit on the board already. Basically the major publishing companies have adopted the "Agency Model" which sets prices for e-books. The sellers of e-books cannot change the price. They can't offer sales or discounts. Do a search for Agency Model or pricing for more information.

          • Re: Price of eBooks vs. paperback
            Doug_Pardee

            E-books are priced at whatever people will pay.The big publishers are finding that people will pay premium prices for e-books, even after the paperback comes out, and the big publishers are in business to make money, not to be nice guys. It's like buying popcorn at the movies: it costs the theater about 15 cents to produce a large popcorn, but they've learned that their patrons will pay far more.

             

            If you want lower-priced e-books, look to the smaller publishers and the self-publishers. Until large numbers of readers choose to buy lower-priced works instead of paying premium prices for the Big Name series books from the big publishers, prices will keep going up.

             

              • Re: Price of eBooks vs. paperback

                 


                Doug_Pardee wrote:

                E-books are priced at whatever people will pay.The big publishers are finding that people will pay premium prices for e-books, even after the paperback comes out, and the big publishers are in business to make money, not to be nice guys. It's like buying popcorn at the movies: it costs the theater about 15 cents to produce a large popcorn, but they've learned that their patrons will pay far more.

                 

                If you want lower-priced e-books, look to the smaller publishers and the self-publishers. Until large numbers of readers choose to buy lower-priced works instead of paying premium prices for the Big Name series books from the big publishers, prices will keep going up.

                 


                 

                How are e-books any different from other things? In a free market all things are priced at what people are willing to pay.

                 

                How is only the "big" business in it to make money? If I walk into a small mom and pop store will they ring me up and give me money because they are not in it to make money?

                 

                The whole reason those books are lower priced is because there is less demand for them because they are not from a known author.  In one case the track record of good books get people to buy the book in the other it is the low price.

                  • Re: Price of eBooks vs. paperback
                    Doug_Pardee

                    scott88 wrote:

                     

                    How are e-books any different from other things? In a free market all things are priced at what people are willing to pay.


                    You and I know that, but there are an awful lot of people who post pricing complaints based on "e-books are cheaper to make than paperbacks so they should cost less."

                     


                    scott88 wrote:

                     

                    How is only the "big" business in it to make money? If I walk into a small mom and pop store will they ring me up and give me money because they are not in it to make money?

                    A number of smaller, privately-owned operations believe in giving "value for the money" and playing fair with everyone they deal with, even though they know it means they won't get rich. In the publishing world, one beacon of that attitude is Baen. I've heard some good things about Akashic, too.

                     

                    Most of the big publishers are made up of what were once small publishers. When those small publishers were independent, they did things a lot differently than they do now. They took personal interest in the welfare and future of their authors, they published books they knew weren't going to make money just because the publisher believed they were good books that deserved to be published, and they tried to price their product fairly, with a small profit for themselves.

                     

                    A publicly-traded international conglomerate doesn't have those options. The stockholders want to see big profits every quarter.