7 Replies Latest reply: Feb 18, 2011 11:12 AM by Desert_Brat

    eBook Pricing

      Being anewbie on the Nook Color, I was enjoying reading and the ease at which I could purchase books.  Now that the pricing has changed, I have to question my decision to venture into the eReader market..  With eBook pricing being higher than the hardback edition, I feel my eBook purchasing will decrease if not stop altogether.

       

      Examples: (Two from the Biography section)

       

      Known and Unknown Donal Rumsfeld Onlin price $19.10 eBook $19.99

       

      In the Blink of an Eye Michael Waltrip $14.93 eBook $14.99

       

       

      Is anyone purchasing eBooks that cost more than the hardback version?

       

      Hopefully the publishers will wake up.

       

      I'm glad the Nook works with the local libraries. 

        • Re: eBook Pricing
          bklvr896

           


          pcbiker wrote:

          Being anewbie on the Nook Color, I was enjoying reading and the ease at which I could purchase books.  Now that the pricing has changed, I have to question my decision to venture into the eReader market..  With eBook pricing being higher than the hardback edition, I feel my eBook purchasing will decrease if not stop altogether.

           

          Examples: (Two from the Biography section)

           

          Known and Unknown Donal Rumsfeld Onlin price $19.10 eBook $19.99

           

          In the Blink of an Eye Michael Waltrip $14.93 eBook $14.99

           

           

          Is anyone purchasing eBooks that cost more than the hardback version?

           

          Hopefully the publishers will wake up.

           

          I'm glad the Nook works with the local libraries. 


           

          Yes, they are.  Last week or so, The Donald Rumsfeld books was in the top 20 best selling eBooks on B&N.

           

          Fall of Giants, Ken Follett, at $19.99 was in the top 10/20 best selling eBooks for months at that price, higher than the HC.  I don't know that the publishers are going to "wake up".  I looked at the top 20 best selling eBooks according to the NYT, and 9 of those books were $12.99 or higher, so prices don't seem to be stopping people from buying the books.

           

          I may buy it higher than the HC, if it's a book I would have purchased in HC anyway.  I buy the book for the content and the story, not so much for the format, so as long as it's close priced to the other formats, I'll take the convenience of the eBook over a dollar or so and a print book.

            • Re: eBook Pricing
              Allem-o

               


              bklvr896 wrote:

               



               

               

              I may buy it higher than the HC, if it's a book I would have purchased in HC anyway.  I buy the book for the content and the story, not so much for the format, so as long as it's close priced to the other formats, I'll take the convenience of the eBook over a dollar or so and a print book.


               

              +1^^^^ What he said...

               

              This is the same place where that I have settled to.  And there are still plenty of ebooks below the $15 and $10 threshold that I like to be at, for me to read.  But for a book like Rumsfeld that I want to read, I'll pay the $20 price. 

               

              That said, if it is not an agency model book and B&N is significantly higher then other retailers, then I'll buy from them and sideload, or even hit the library site for a copy.  I'm a free market guy, so if B&N wants to price themselves out on certain books..so be it.  However I've also seen B&N have lower prices on some books then the other sites, so in the end it generally all balances out.  IMHO.

            • Re: eBook Pricing

              "Now that the pricing has changed"...

               

              When did the pricing change? There's not been anything new by way of pricing that I know of since the Agency Model came to be, which predated the NOOK color by some time.

               

              There really aren't that many examples of eBooks being priced higher, and these are very bad examples. $0.70 and $0.07 price differences aren't something that many people are going to care about.

               

              In any event, if the books sell at a given price, no matter what that price is, then the market has spoken and that's the price it's going to sell at. The only thing I see to complain about here is Agency pricing preventing the retailer from setting prices for promotional purposes.

              • Re: eBook Pricing

                interesting points desert.  I guess what I really meant was as a market that is getting active customers, it is still fairly early.  either way my point was it doesn't matter if it costs 1/2 the cost of a normal book, if the number of customers is just 10% that of normal books pricing might be higher.

                 

                 

                  • Re: eBook Pricing
                    Desert_Brat

                     


                    RSC_Nook wrote:

                    interesting points desert.  I guess what I really meant was as a market that is getting active customers, it is still fairly early.  either way my point was it doesn't matter if it costs 1/2 the cost of a normal book, if the number of customers is just 10% that of normal books pricing might be higher.

                     

                     


                     

                    I forgot to mention that Gutenberg Project began in 1971.

                     

                    But the concept of "e-books" has been around for a while. There was even an era of "books on disk" and "books on CD" (these were NOT audio books) before the commercial advent of the many e-readers we've seen come and go, like the Iliad or iRex and quite a few others actually. There was quite a push for the BeBe format a few years ago. Thankfully the market has gone with the epub format instead. But at the time, you had to use whatever format was for your particular e-reader. And very few of them could read .txt files even. It was a very proprietary market.

                     

                    Contrary to popular thought, Kindle wasn't the first to produce an e-reader. It just made one that looked better (e-ink vs. gray scale) and had a longer battery life with a smaller battery as opposed to 6-8 AA size batteries. In comparison, think of how much GPS units have changed. You can get one on a wristwatch now.