9 Replies Latest reply on Dec 28, 2010 5:47 AM by Suengel

    Why should I pay for classics on Nook when they are free on Kindle?

      I just got my Christmas Nook and was dismayed to see that I can download hundreds of free classic books onto a Kindle but have to pay for almost all of the same titles for a Nook. It isn't much, sometimes only 99 cents, but still, they should match the price.  Or should I return my Nook and buy a Kindle instead?

        • Re: Why should I pay for classics on Nook when they are free on Kindle?
          Doug_Pardee

          Classics are available for free on NOOK. You'll find many different versions of each classic available. Sorting through the various versions isn't easy from NOOK. You're better off browsing them online here on bn.com, so that you can see what the differences are. The ones that have a price presumably included added value, such as commentary, illustrations, or at least better proofreading.

           

          The Barnes & Noble Classics series are typically $1.99, sometimes $2.99. These include scholarly commentary and footnotes, and occasionally illustrations. Depending on the book, that can be important or unimportant. Trying to work your way through Beowulf just looking at the text can make you crazy. :smileytongue: Here's what B&N has to say about the added features of B&N Classics: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/classics/index.asp?PID=19278

           

          If you want to find a free title from your NOOK, just add a "0.00" (without the quotes) ahead of the title you're looking for. Then it should only return the free versions.

           

          You can also download free EPUBs from sites like Feedbooks, Manybooks, and Project Gutenberg, and sideload those onto your NOOK.

           

            • Re: Why should I pay for classics on Nook when they are free on Kindle?

              Thank you for your reply...and for your other very helpful posts. yes I agree Beowulf or Canterbury Tales would not be my first choice for solo reading.

               

              I find the amazon site for Kindle instantly takes me to a list of hundreds of classics which I could easily download.  For the Nook I seem to need to search for the titles individually with the 0.00 in front. An easy solution would be a similar listing on this website.    Yes I am trying to sideload free classics off the internet to ADE and then transfer them to my Nook. but this seems very tedious because downloads are taking a  very long time. So my next question is:

               

              is the site just overwhelmed with users today? It is taking 20 minutes to download one book from my BN library to my Nook. I could drive to my local library or BN store and get the book in 20 minutes!

                • Re: Why should I pay for classics on Nook when they are free on Kindle?

                  Site been Overwhelmed since Christmas EVE So be patient.... I heard the same problems on Amazon LOL  IF you go ahead & ouder the books here they will pop on your nook .  My wifi at home is iffy so when I get up usually all the changes I made before I go to bed are are changed on the nook & ready to read!  When I get up.  And yes was lot faster 2 weeks ago when I got it LOL   

                  • Re: Why should I pay for classics on Nook when they are free on Kindle?
                    Doug_Pardee

                    The multiple versions of the classics are indeed a bit of confusion here on B&N. The confusion has been multiplied recently by B&N's startup of PubIt!, their self-publishing platform. PubIt!'s rules specifically allow republishing of the classics, and many PubIt! e-books are just that. Some NOOKbook customers have taken considerable exception to this situation. The weak search tools on NOOK don't help any, either.

                     

                    You shouldn't need to use ADE to sideload free classic e-books. Just drag and drop them into the 'my documents' folder (on the classic NOOK). You can use ADE if you want, but most of us prefer Calibre for library management, and only use ADE for dealing with Adobe DRM-ed e-books. The reason is simple: ADE is not a very user-friendly tool.

                     

                    And yes, B&N's servers are terribly overloaded from the Christmas rush.

                     

                    [Personal opinion follows.] I'd like to be able to say that it's just an anomaly, but the reality is that B&N's server farm has been shaky from the beginning and hasn't ever really stabilized. I was pretty sure we were going to see a meltdown from the Christmas rush, and I'm afraid that I was right. Most of the time the servers work okay, but something like every few weeks there'll be a glitch that'll last for a few hours or a day or two, and it's been getting worse recently. First they did a redesign of the site which made things flakier, and then they rolled out NOOKcolor which added to the overload. [B&N CEO] William Lynch needs to kick some behinds or roll some heads. There's simply no excuse for this kind of failure after more than a year of operation, and no excuse for not expecting—and preparing for—a massive demand surge on Christmas Day.

                     

                    Which isn't to say that I don't love my NOOK, and most of the B&N people. I'm generally very pleased. I just wish the folks on Eighth Street would get enough computer power in there, and get their software stabilized. [end opinion]

                     

                • Re: Why should I pay for classics on Nook when they are free on Kindle?
                  Doug_Pardee

                  By the way, there are a lot of free non-classics as well.

                   

                  Some publishers regularly do "for a limited time" free promotions. These are usually when a new book in a series is coming out, and they give away an earlier book in the series (often the first one) for free for a week or two. Also, a few publishers seem to be experimenting with giving away a new release for a few days to get it instantly onto the "best-seller" list when they switch it to paid. Some of us try to keep track of these in this thread: http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/NOOKbook-Discussion/Free-NOOKbook-summary-thread-please-no-OT/m-p/770316#M17106

                   

                  Some publishers—notably Harlequin—give away some works as samples of a line, and some give away short stories and novellas related to a series. These e-books tend to be "permanently" free, and I try to keep track of them in that same thread.

                   

                  Also, some self-published authors at Smashwords give away their work. Those are usually "unknown" authors, and yes, a lot of it is junk. But there are some quality stories being given away if you look for them. B&N carries about 2000 free Smashwords titles. I find it easier to sort through them at Smashwords itself, rather than on my NOOK. For one thing, you can easily read the first few pages right on the Web over there.

                   

                  • Re: Why should I pay for classics on Nook when they are free on Kindle?

                    I downloaded all my classics from Gutenburg for free and side loaded them using calibre.  Easy as pie.

                    • Re: Why should I pay for classics on Nook when they are free on Kindle?

                      chipsanddip wrote:

                      I just got my Christmas Nook and was dismayed to see that I can download hundreds of free classic books onto a Kindle but have to pay for almost all of the same titles for a Nook. It isn't much, sometimes only 99 cents, but still, they should match the price.  Or should I return my Nook and buy a Kindle instead?


                       

                      Short answer: You shouldn't.

                       

                      Long answer: Barnes and Noble uses an "added value" approach to out-of-copyright works that are available for free. They tack on an introduction, some added commentary, a couple maps and/or timelines, and then charge you .99 for the whole thing. That doesn't mean you have to pay to get the out-of-copyright work. Since Nook uses the ePub format, you don't have to get your book from Barnes and Noble. You can go to just about anywhere (Google Books is a good place to start, IMO) and get free out-of-copyright works without B&N's "added value" or .99 price.

                       

                      Since Kindle doesn't use an open-source format and is chained to Amazon's store, going to a competing vendor or giant library of free books like Google isn't an option. This is a large part of the reason I went with Nook over Kindle.

                      • Re: Why should I pay for classics on Nook when they are free on Kindle?

                        WhenyousearchforabookorauthorthedefaultsortisbyTopMatches. YoucanchangeittoPriceandyouwillseethecheapestcopiesfirst.

                         

                        IdidalittleresearchandfoundthatAmazon, BarnesNoble, andGooglealllistebookclassicsthatareabsolutecrap. Manyarebadphotocopiesordigitalversionsofoldlibrarybooksandnotworthevendownloadingforfree. InadditionAmazonandB&NletfolkshopingtomakeaquickbuckcopyGutenbergtitlesandsellthemintheironlinestores. Someofthesejokersevenlistthemselvesasauthororco-authors.

                        Example: Gulliver'sTravelsbyThomasM. Ballietdoesn'tevenlistJonathanSwiftasauthor. TheBarnesandNobleClassicsandEssentialReadingbookscostverylittleandmuchbetterthanGutenbergormostotherfreeversions.

                         

                        Thebookstoresclaimmillionsofebooksbutalargeportionofthemareawasteoftime. LookforversionsfromrealpublisherslikePenguinandevenBarnesandNobleitself.

                         

                        Alsobewareofcheap "classics" thatarejustsummariesanddon'tincludethewholebook. MightjustaswellreadCliffNotesorWikipediasummaries.

                         

                        • Re: Why should I pay for classics on Nook when they are free on Kindle?

                          Hi there, you are right there is no need to pay for the classics. On your PC, head over to the project gutenberg website there you will find an extensive collection of public domain ebooks. Download all that you wish. Then connect your NC to your PC and using adobe digital editions transfer over.

                          The reason I've seen for paying for the classics is that they supposely offer extra contect i.e. images or discussion notes etc. If you just wish the classics contect then perhaps project gutenberg would take care of your needs.

                           

                          Hope this helps,