6 Replies Latest reply: Oct 8, 2010 9:41 PM by bklvr896

    Newest Price Point $14.99 & up

      Anyone noticing lately that the price point for more and more new releases seems to be $14.99 & up?  I guess as the Agency 5 convince themselves that the public is accepting their $12.99 price fix, they can now push the price up? 

        • Re: Newest Price Point $14.99 & up
          flyingtoastr

          When I check the NYT bestseller list I see 3 out of the first 45 books that are $14.99 or higher.

           

          Just saying.

          • Re: Newest Price Point $14.99 & up

            Not this discussion again. No, that's not "the newest price point", and if it were, who cares? If you don't like the price, don't buy. As stated so many times, this is the ONLY thing that will force the prices down.

              • Re: Newest Price Point $14.99 & up

                Sure, why not this discussion again?  Its important to a lot of people.  No one has been appointed GOD over these forums and thereby gets to pick the subject of all the threads. Geez, I am so tired of the MEANNESS on these boards.

                 

                And yes, while many of the books on the NYT bestseller list may be below $14.99, I have noticed how much more expensive the new releases are also.

              • Re: Newest Price Point $14.99 & up

                Hardcover Edition and another retailer - here I come.

                 

                B&N"s price for Vince Flynn's new release is $15.11 for a hardcover - that you can lend as often as you like or even resell - vs. $14.99 for the B&N eBook that you might (never a certainty) be able to lend only once.

                 

                I feel I was roped into buying my Nook with promises of great savings only to find those savings disappear, once the company and the publishers saw the eBook market growing.  The facts are there.  It costs considerably less to produce and distribute an eBook.  What is happening now is a Bait and Switch tactic that should not be encouraged or supported.

                 

                I'm going to show my displeasure by by-passing the eBook and, for a double hit, purchase the hardcover edition at a nearby warehouse store, where the price may even be lower than the eBook.

                 

                If more of us took our business elsewhere B&N might exert their power to get us a better deal.

                 

                Retailers and publishers will listen to us only if and when we make a significant dent in their bottom line.

                  • Re: Newest Price Point $14.99 & up

                    We have to keep repeating that we will not buy ebooks at these artificially priced fixed prices.  One of the reasons I bought a nook is that I am a voracious reader--5-7 books a week.  At the 9.99 price point, the $5 or so I was saving per book would have paid for my nook within a 3-4 month period. In the first weeks I purchased my nook, I bought probably a dozen or more books. As soon as the Agency 5 started the price fixing, setting the prices almost the same as hardcover or more, the savings disappeared.  So, instead of purchasing 5-7 books a week, I only buy 2-3 per month, getting the rest from the library or other free sources. 

                     

                    I will not purchase at these prices. And we have to keep telling retailers this, so that they can use it to resist the Agency 5 price fixing.

                     

                    • Re: Newest Price Point $14.99 & up
                      bklvr896

                       


                      Defiance wrote:

                      Hardcover Edition and another retailer - here I come.

                       

                      B&N"s price for Vince Flynn's new release is $15.11 for a hardcover - that you can lend as often as you like or even resell - vs. $14.99 for the B&N eBook that you might (never a certainty) be able to lend only once.

                       

                      This one annoys me, I wrote to the publisher but never heard back.  The problem is that the retailers are allowed to discount the HC, which they do, but not the eBook.  That's where you get this type of pricing.

                       

                      I feel I was roped into buying my Nook with promises of great savings only to find those savings disappear, once the company and the publishers saw the eBook market growing.  The facts are there.  It costs considerably less to produce and distribute an eBook.  What is happening now is a Bait and Switch tactic that should not be encouraged or supported.

                       

                      This argument has been discussed many times, and the production costs are not the significant cost of producing any type of book.  A NYT article put it at about 12.5%.  The cost for the book is the editing, marketing, royalties and business overhead costs, which are the same, regardless of the format of the book.  Not that I'm agreeing with the prices.  

                       

                      I'm going to show my displeasure by by-passing the eBook and, for a double hit, purchase the hardcover edition at a nearby warehouse store, where the price may even be lower than the eBook.

                       

                      The publisher will have still gotten their money, regardless of where you purchase it.  They may get somewhat less, depending on the contract they have with the Warehouse store, but what you pay for really doesn't impact what the publisher gets.  The only way the publisher doesn't get any money is if you buy it used.

                       

                      If more of us took our business elsewhere B&N might exert their power to get us a better deal.

                       

                      Amazon (who is much bigger and probably has more influence) tried this when all this first started, with Penguin.  Penguin called them on it and for a month, Kindle owners couldn't purchase any new Penguin releases.  With in a month, Amazon caved.

                       

                      Retailers and publishers will listen to us only if and when we make a significant dent in their bottom line.

                       

                      True, but I would also bet that some of the smaller retailers are ok with the Agency model because it levels the playing field.  Amazon can afford to sell the books at a loss, they can just add the $3.00 or so to some other product, like a TV.  The smaller retailers don't have that option and they can't continually sell items at a loss.