12 Replies Latest reply on Dec 8, 2013 5:28 AM by LectorGS

    Is e-ink really better?

    cgsmom

      I have been reading ebooks since about 2004. I first read on my PDA with Microsoft Reader. When that died, I got an iPod touch. Then a Nook Tablet and recently HD+.  Now I am getting older (aren't we all) and I have retired so I find I am reading a lot more. I notice my eyes get tired more often and I am wondering if e-ink would help.  The NSTG is on sale for $49 for Cyber Monday. I am reluctant to spend $119 for the new Glowlight not knowing if I would even like e-ink. What do you all think? Thanks for any advice.

        • Re: Is e-ink really better?
          JinSC

          $119 is a big investment if you are not sure you will like the technology.  Normally, I wouldn't advocate this, but have you considered buying and returning if dissatisfied?

           

          Also, if your eyes are getting tired, I recommend trying:

           

          1) increasing the font size

          2) adjusting screen brightness

          3) changing fonts (i find fonts with serifs easier to read, but I know others who are the opposite)

          4)  adjust the line spacing (makes text much more readable)

           

          Peace,

          Jeremy

          • Re: Is e-ink really better?
            MacMcK1957

            Yes, it really is better.  Far less tiring on the eyes, and far easier to read.  If you can find any remaining inventory ($39 for the original NST, $49 for the NST with Glow) grab it.  I guarantee you will not be sorry.

            • Re: Is e-ink really better?
              cgsmom

              Thanks for all the replies.  However, by the time that I decided to buy the NSTGL, it was already sold out online.  Oh well, I will have to see what the store has the next time I go.

               

              Thanks again.

               

                • Re: Is e-ink really better?
                  Mercury_Glitch

                  Likely they will be sold out of the Simpletouch with Glowlight, the sales for that one have been really big incentives for purchasing.

                   

                  They may or may not have the original Simpletouch, Black Friday brought some amazing sales for that model.

                   

                  They ought to have the new Nook Glowlight, which if you don't mind the lack of an SD card, side buttons, and the white color would be just as good.

                   

                  I expect the buttons wont be an issue for you as you're coming from devices that don't have them.  There are skins from decalgirl that will allow you to change the color (I've got a black one on my NGL which I feel makes the light grey ring pop out more, as well as making the screen pop more.  There are a variety of colors and designs available.

                   

                  You do get more storage on the NGL, which helps counter the lack of the SD card slot, it doesn't totally negate it as the storage is limited.

                    • Re: Is e-ink really better?
                      DeanGibson

                      I have e-Ink and color Nooks, and for me, the choice of which device to use for reading is based on battery life.  I have spent so much of my life in front of a computer screen, that I don't find e-Ink to have any other advantage.

                       

                      However, when I loaned my dad my Nook Touch for reading a book, he didn't like the frequency of page turns (due to the small screen).  If you want to reduce the number of page turns (eg, you are a speed reader), you might find the Nook HD+ a better choice.

                  • Re: Is e-ink really better?
                    BFCoughlin

                    I'm going to be a dissenting voice.  I now have the new GlowLight, replacing a Simple Touch that I gave to a friend.  I also have the Nook Color and the HD+.  I'm 60 and wicked nearsighted, but now with the far-sightenedness of aging.  I like the e-ink readers for their light weight and low cost.  This is the one I toss into my bag every day so if I'm stuck somewhere, I have books to read.  It's the one I take when we're camping or staying somewhere else overnight.  It's the one I use for reading out in the garden in the summer.  But when it comes to the hour or two I read every night at home, I find that the text on the HD+ is just crisper.  Between that and the larger page size, I find it's easier on the eyes than the e-ink. I keep the brightness turned down to about the same degree of brightness a CTD would have.  I suppose it's a matter of personal experience. 

                      • Re: Is e-ink really better?
                        Dinerfiend

                        I have only owned LCD Nooks (first the Nook Color, now the Nook HD), but I spent a good deal of time in the BN store testing out the e-ink models.  I agree with the poster above that the text on the LCD screens is substantially crisper and more legible---and not just the HD; the text on the Nook Color also was far better than that on the e-ink models.  Plus, I found the screen flash when the page turns on the e-ink versions to be quite distracting and jarring on the eyes, although I understand that these flashes have been greatly diminished with the addition of the NGL versus the NSTG.

                         

                        I've been an avid Nook reader for more than 3 years now, and I have never noticed eye strain reading either in a bright room or in the dark with all of the lights turned off.  I do, however, add that I use the "night" theme (dark gray background, white text) when I'm reading in the dark and turn the illumination down relatively low, so perhaps that helps save mny eyes from strain. In short, I think that reading on the LCD provides a better reading experience.  After getting used to the LCD models, the text on the e-ink models just looks kind of blurry and fuzzy. 

                          • Re: Is e-ink really better?
                            keriflur

                            Dinerfiend wrote:

                            I have only owned LCD Nooks (first the Nook Color, now the Nook HD), but I spent a good deal of time in the BN store testing out the e-ink models.  I agree with the poster above that the text on the LCD screens is substantially crisper and more legible---and not just the HD; the text on the Nook Color also was far better than that on the e-ink models.


                            Everyone is different, of course, but the crispness of the text isn't generally the defining factor in whether or not someone experiences eye strain while reading for a long period of time.  It has to do with the backlit screen.

                             

                            Backlit screens also, for whatever reason, usually cause people to blink less, which leads to eye dryness.  This may be a factor in that "tired" feeling also.

                              • Re: Is e-ink really better?
                                MacMcK1957

                                keriflur wrote:

                                  ...

                                Everyone is different, of course, but the crispness of the text isn't generally the defining factor in whether or not someone experiences eye strain while reading for a long period of time.  It has to do with the backlit screen.

                                Backlit screens also, for whatever reason, usually cause people to blink less, which leads to eye dryness.  This may be a factor in that "tired" feeling also.


                                I have been surprised (and a bit puzzled) since getting my NSTG that the sidelit e-ink screen does not tire my eyes at all the way a backlit LCD screen does.  Not sure why this would be the case, but there it is.

                                  • Re: Is e-ink really better?
                                    Mercury_Glitch

                                    MacMcK1957 wrote:

                                    keriflur wrote:

                                      ...

                                    Everyone is different, of course, but the crispness of the text isn't generally the defining factor in whether or not someone experiences eye strain while reading for a long period of time.  It has to do with the backlit screen.

                                    Backlit screens also, for whatever reason, usually cause people to blink less, which leads to eye dryness.  This may be a factor in that "tired" feeling also.


                                    I have been surprised (and a bit puzzled) since getting my NSTG that the sidelit e-ink screen does not tire my eyes at all the way a backlit LCD screen does.  Not sure why this would be the case, but there it is.


                                     

                                     

                                    Softer light, when you look at an LCD screen you're basically being beamed with light in a direct way.  This is why I suggest a white text on dark background (on the Nooks it's dark grey) for reading.  When given the option I change settings on my accounts on various websites to black backgrounds with light text.

                                     

                                    The NSTG, and NGL beam the light down in to a layer that defuses the light around and up.  It's basically like you're sitting with a lamp on in the room. 

                                     

                                    It's not entirely the same, since the light is bouncing up toward you at (probably) a stronger level than the light bouncing off walls in a room.  But it's comparable to that versus the LCD devices which are more comparable with looking at a lightbulb directly. 

                            • Re: Is e-ink really better?
                              LectorGS

                              E-ink may or may not be better.  One thing it is:  it's flexible.  Readers can adjust font sizes, density, etc. Current systems like the one on the KPW provide readers access to external sources which enhance the reading experience.  Having an e-reader maximizes the benefits and the joy of the reading experience by minimizing the effort of getting external resources such as dictionaries, light, etc.

                               

                              All in one, it narrows down to convenience and flexibility.  The content of the book, whether it's a DTB, or its electronic version, remains the same.

                               

                              There is, however, an aspect that e-ink will never be able to provide the "tridimensional" effect of holding a real book.