3 Replies Latest reply on Nov 12, 2013 10:51 AM by MacMcK1957

    Wired & Vanity Fair magazines no longer interactive?

      I've noticed the recent issues of Wired and Vanity Fair are no longer interactive.  Instead, they act like images or books.  Previously, there was a good bit of interactive content, including the table of contents, the cover, and web links. Has the publisher changed their content or am I somehow getting a bum file?

        • Re: Wired & Vanity Fair magazines no longer interactive?

          There's a lengthly thread regarding similar issues with the New Yorker magazine.  If you search New Yorker, you should find the thread.  I'm not sure if the issue was resolved.

          • Re: Wired & Vanity Fair magazines no longer interactive?

            I suspect it is the same deal as The New Yorker.  Sounds like some kind of software issue but the question to me is still who's fault it is. I'm thinking B&N no longer wishes to support whatever is necessary to make them interactive tho I could be wrong there. Given that this has happend with the New Yorker, I'm betting it's B&N driving that train.  Bottom line? It's not a corrupt copy or anything else. Some of these magazines are now being offered by B&N as non-interactive.  I can pretty much guarantee that is NOT the case with the iPad. Darn Apple again.  I won't be getting an iPad and I won't be subscribing to any magazines that go that route. Perhaps the Goolg ePlay version of the magazine is still interactive.

              • Re: Wired & Vanity Fair magazines no longer interactive?
                MacMcK1957

                I'm thinking B&N no longer wishes to support whatever is necessary to make them interactive tho I could be wrong there.

                 

                Kind of a gray area.  B&N has not removed any existing functionality.  It seems that magazine publishers may have made some update to their interactive content so that it no longer works with the existing B&N program, and B&N has not upgraded to deal with it.  So then the next obvious step is to deliver the non-interactive version of the publication to the devices where the interactive will no longer work.

                 

                Whose fault is it?  Take your pick.