16 Replies Latest reply on Dec 30, 2010 5:33 AM by Ya_Ya

    E-book buyers UNITE against outrageous prices for ebooks! Call for 90-day moritorium.

      I bought a Nook for 2 reasons: ebooks were cheaper than print copies and it was more convenient to carry my library with me rather than 8 or 10 books at a time! Now the ebooks are too expensive--some cost as much as the hardcover copy (American Rose is a prime example!). I don't care what the "competition" charges---I only care what Nook charges! No ebook should sell for more than 75% of the paperback version. Now that I can't save money by buying ebooks, I'm going to just get them from the library---FREE OF CHARGE! I refuse to pay these horrendous prices for an electronic book that has no production expenses other than conversion of a digital copy to the proper format---which is all done by computer anyway! The high prices are proof of the greed of the publishers and we are fools if we let them get away with it. It seems to me that price fixing on the open market is illegal under anti-trust laws. Perhaps we should write our Congressperson. I think all ebook users should unite and have a 90-day moritorium on buying any outrageously-priced ebooks. We can refuse to buy any books priced higher than 75% of the paperback version. EBOOK USERS UNITE! If we stand together we can FORCE the publishers to be more reasonable in their pricing of electronic books---but we must stand together and make a loud, angry statement or continue to be walked on and cheated by the big publishers!!!! Either stand up and fight---or stop whining!!

        • Re: E-book buyers UNITE against outrageous prices for ebooks! Call for 90-day moritorium.

          Sorry, but this is a tiresome post.

           

          Did you not do your research before buying your nook? These prices have been in effect since April 2010. It's not going to change either.

           

          Personally I bought my nook for convenience, no where in the deal did I read ebooks were cheaper than any other format. Would I like it to be so, of course. is it going to stop me from buying ebooks, nope!!

           

          All of the people complaining about price should have checked before purchasing their nooks.

            • Re: E-book buyers UNITE against outrageous prices for ebooks! Call for 90-day moritorium.

              While I agree with the sentiment, your tea party is basically a tea party for one.  Dismissed like the actual tea party.

               

              Consumers consume and voraciously at this price point.  I believe it's wrong and won't buy from those publishers at those prices... but many do.

               

               

               

               

               

               

              • Re: E-book buyers UNITE against outrageous prices for ebooks! Call for 90-day moritorium.
                Allem-o

                Jenniisme wrote:

                Sorry, but this is a tiresome post.

                 

                Did you not do your research before buying your nook? These prices have been in effect since April 2010. It's not going to change either.

                 

                Personally I bought my nook for convenience, no where in the deal did I read ebooks were cheaper than any other format. Would I like it to be so, of course. is it going to stop me from buying ebooks, nope!!

                 

                All of the people complaining about price should have checked before purchasing their nooks.


                +1 to Jennisme's post ...

                 

                To the OP, wait about six months and the price point usually drops.  I don't see a conflict with publishers or retailers charging what the market will bear for a new release book.  After all, for every ebook I buy, it is one less dtb they sell.  Therefore they do need to recoup their overhead for the ebook just like they do for the dtb at that point.  I want the publishers/retailers/authors to remain profitable.

                 

                My particular price point is usualy $10, and there is plenty of reading material for me at that price and below.  Enough to keep me busy until newer dtbs drop to the $10 range.  However I do make exceptions. 

                 

                I recently bought "Setting the Desert on Fire" which was on sale for under $4.  I had had my eye on the new T.E. Lawrence bio "Hero", but wasn't willing to pay the $20 price.  After reading "Setting..." though, I wanted more details surrounding Lawrence's overall life, so I pulled the trigger a couple of days ago and bought "Hero".  In the end I paid less then $24 for  the two ebooks, where the dtb versions would have cost me $36.  I figured I came out ahead.

                 

                What I don't lilke about the current situation is that the retailers are not allowed to sell the ebooks at the prices they want to, which takes free market practices out of the equation.  However the retailers signed the contracts so it is what it is.   

                 

                I want to buy ebooks as I have no more shelf space in my home for dtbs.  And I want to have the option to buy a new release ebook the same day the dtb version is released. Therefore I am willing to pay a few 'extra' dollars for that.  Overall, I have bought more ebooks this year then 2009 and at a comparable total dollar amount.  In the end 2010 has been a win for me in both space and monetary savings. 

              • Re: E-book buyers UNITE against outrageous prices for ebooks! Call for 90-day moritorium.

                What is especially galling is those publishers who refuse to make their books available for lending through libraries at all.

                 


                GaeaGirl wrote:

                I'm going to just get them from the library---FREE OF CHARGE!


                 

                • Re: E-book buyers UNITE against outrageous prices for ebooks! Call for 90-day moritorium.
                  Doug_Pardee

                  As the others have said, you're right: if you don't like the price, don't buy it. But there's no point in a "e-book buyers unite" posting. The buyers will decide that on their own, and 99.99% or more of them aren't reading this forum anyway.

                   

                  For the moment, the e-book buyers have shown that they're quite satisfied to pay the prices being charged.

                   

                  By the way, there are plenty of inexpensive e-books out there. This year, more than 300 titles were given away for free by the publishers as promotions. See this thread for the current list of free promos: http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/NOOKbook-Discussion/Free-NOOKbook-summary-thread-please-no-OT/m-p/774544#M17259

                   

                  Right now, the e-book stores are running a $5 sale on many of the non-Agency e-books. A list of B&N $5 specials can be found here: http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/NOOKbook-Discussion/5-NOOKbook-sale/m-p/771672#M17150 and some other e-book stores have an even larger list on sale, notably Borders.

                   

                  There are plenty of other sales going, too. If you like romances, Harlequin's offering five titles a day for $0.99 for the next week or so if you buy direct from them and use a discount code. Check out the Books on the Knob blog for details; that blog's a great place to keep on top of e-book deals.

                   

                  Some publishers such as Baen sell e-books directly at a relatively low price. Baen's standard price for an e-book is $6.

                   

                  If you're willing to give an "unknown" author a try, you have a big selection of inexpensive and even free e-books available via Smashwords and PubIt!. Here's a thread where PubIt! authors are putting their e-books on sale, mostly for $0.99: http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/NOOKbook-Discussion/Holiday-sale-from-Authors-for-our-favorite-people-Readers/td-p/772356

                   

                  Personally, I've spent about $45 on e-books in the almost 10 months I've had my NOOK, and I have a library of about 500 e-book titles now. None of them are pirated. No, I don't have the latest titles by the Big Name authors. If you want those, you're going to have to get them from the library or pay the price for them—just as you do with printed books.

                   

                  • Greed and legality
                    Doug_Pardee

                    GaeaGirl wrote:

                     

                    The high prices are proof of the greed of the publishers and we are fools if we let them get away with it. It seems to me that price fixing on the open market is illegal under anti-trust laws.


                    The 'Big 6' publishers are multi-national conglomerates. They exist for the sole purpose of making the maximum profit for their shareholders. They're greedy by definition. If you expect that they'll ever be anything other than greedy, you're the fool.

                     

                    As for the anti-trust laws, in 2007 the US Supreme Court ruled that Retail Price Maintenance wasn't anti-competitive.

                     

                    The Agency Model publishers are also using an almost century-old principle that for consignment sales, the seller gets to set the price, not the dealer. E-books aren't bought in advance by the booksellers. The booksellers merely advertise the e-books on behalf of the publishers, handle the financial transactions, and deliver the goods. That's effectively the same as consignment sales.

                     

                    • Re: E-book buyers UNITE...no thanks
                      RHWright

                      @GaeaGirl:

                       

                      You say one of the reasons you bought a Nook was "eBooks were cheaper than print copies."

                       

                      Really? A search of this forum prior to purchase would have revealed this was a contentious issue. A representative search on bn.com for the books you were interested in would have shown you the price points you are looking at.

                       

                      This "e-book buyers unite" business is beating a seriously dead horse.

                       

                      Now, while I agree with some of your sentiments and would, naturally, like to see prices as low as possible for the books I want, the boycott mentality just doesn't seem to be playing out in this marketplace.

                       

                      I'm taking a reasoned approach to my message to publishers. I don't buy what I think is not worth it, but make sure to keep it on my wish list and buy it if it drops to a price I like. Publishers, like many businesses, prefer specific data.

                       

                      A general 90-day sales drop will just be perceived as some type of general market decline. Either because of the economy or lack of interest in the format or whatever.

                       

                      However, if they see Title A sells only so many at price XX.XX and spikes in sales when dropped to Y.YY, they'll start to get the picture. When it happens again with Titles B, C, D, and so on, they will adjust the pricing strategy.

                       

                      It's about profit. (Welcome to capitalism!)

                       

                      If your price point is 75% of the cheapest paperback version, so be it. Others have the right to disagree and put their own personal value on the products they are interested in. That's how the game works.

                       

                      Even if you go by your standard for pricing, I think you will find many books at low or no cost to keep your NOOK full of enjoyable reading material.

                        • Re: E-book buyers UNITE...no thanks

                          Count me in on the protest.  As a child of the "Politically Correct" generation I love protests! 

                           

                          To signify this protest I drove to B&N by using about $3 in gas, bought a $7 coffee from the cafe, purchased a $3 dollar danish from them, and a $2.99 NookBook.  Hopefully those dang capitalists feel the pain now! 

                           

                          {{{ was there enough dripping sarcasm there? :-) }}}

                           

                          Happy New Year!

                        • Re: E-book buyers UNITE against outrageous prices for ebooks! Call for 90-day moritorium.

                          I'm boycotting this boycott. If I think the nookbook is worth the price, I am willing to pay it, no matter what the paper book costs.

                           

                          If you want to gripe about unreasonable prices, go complain about restaurants that charge $2 for a soft drink that contains about $0.10 worth of sugar water.

                            • Re: E-book buyers UNITE against outrageous prices for ebooks! Call for 90-day moritorium.
                              Ya_Ya

                               


                              KingAl wrote:

                               

                              If you want to gripe about unreasonable prices, go complain about restaurants that charge $2 for a soft drink that contains about $0.10 worth of sugar water.


                              As a chef's wife, I can tell you that the price of soda syrup has jumped crazily in the last few years, so it's not quite *that* big a profit margin, but I get the sentiment.  Coffee is as bad or worse.  $2 for a cup of coffee - based on their wholesale prices they're making a fortune.  Tea is ridiculous; $2 and they paid maybe $.20 for the tea bags...

                               

                            • Re: E-book buyers UNITE against outrageous prices for ebooks! Call for 90-day moritorium.

                              So "more convenient to carry my library with me" is not worth anything to you? A ebook may cost close to the same (or the same) as a paper book but you get the advantage of being able to carry 1,000s of books with you.

                               

                              Also do you think that the server farm (and required cooling and power work) cost nothing? When is the last time tech support was need for a dead tree book?

                               

                              How do you get a library free of charge? Librarys are funded by tax dollars do you not pay taxes?

                              • Re: E-book buyers UNITE against outrageous prices for ebooks! Call for 90-day moritorium.

                                Like most of the posters here - if you had done the proper research before purchasing your Nook - you would have realized that e-books are not necessarily cheaper than DTB's.     I use the same theory with e-books that I used when I bought DTB's if I think it's too expensive - I wait a few months until the price comes down - then buy the book.  My personal ceiling for e-books are $9.99 for a new release(Hardcover version DTB) and $6.99 for what is the paper back version of DTB.   If they are over those prices - I simply add them to my wish list and wait for the price to drop because it will drop - you just have to have patience.     There are those rare occurences where I will pay more than the prices listed above - but it has to be a book that I just CAN'T WAIT to read but those are rare.

                                 

                                The publishers set the price - BN has to abide by that price and no amount of complaining or boycotting by the consumers are going to change that - simply wait for the price to drop if you think it's too expensive.

                                • Re: E-book buyers UNITE against outrageous prices for ebooks! Call for 90-day moritorium.
                                  Desert_Brat

                                  I don't buy expensive books because I have to watch my pennies. Instead I wait and get the book from the library in e-book form if they have it or go check it out physically if I just can't wait. Before nook, I waited until the paperback came out to purchase a book new.

                                   

                                  I have tons of paperbacks, so when a used bookstore opened in our town, I was in hawg heaven! They would give you a percentage of the cover price as a credit depending on what shape the book was in, which could be used to swap out for other books and pay the difference, if any, in cash.

                                   

                                  B&N has a list for used books in their regular marketplace at varying prices depending on condition. I wonder if there could be a way that a used e-book section could be set up. Maybe some buy-back system that would give credit toward the purchase of another book. Or some way that would make the used e-book available for sale at a lower price and credit given to the previous owner. I wouldn't even be upset if I got 50 percent credit and they resold it at the same price I paid for it, at least I'd get a little something. But alas, there are probably all kinds of do's, don'ts, and don't-you-dares with the publishers. You ought to see how the publishers rake regular libraries over the coals! I read elsewhere here that a library can pay $22 for something that might cost us $1.99 because they will be lending it out more than once. Maybe it is greed, I don't know.

                                   

                                  Personally, I think it's a sadder point that publishers only allow a book to be lent out once. With regular books, I can lend them out whenever I feel like it, trade it at the used bookstore, donate it to a school or library or hospital, or even sell it on eBay or at a garage sale. No such thing when buying an e-book, your money is permanently spent. So if you really want to read something and the price isn't within your reach, do go to the public library or perhaps borrow the hardcopy from a friend.

                                   

                                  Personally I don't understand the rights of ownership difference. When I buy a regular book, it becomes my property and I am free to do with it what I please (except for the normal legal stuff) -- read it, sell it, trade it, even burn it. So why is it that something electronic doesn't become my property when I pay for it?

                                   

                                  How many of you have read or seen the movie of Farenheit 451? May it never come to that.

                                  • Re: E-book buyers UNITE against outrageous prices for ebooks! Call for 90-day moritorium.

                                    I agree with GaiaGirl's sentiment, that e-books are over-priced, many ridiculously so.   But I also agree with what other posters have said, that even a minimal amount of research prior to buying the Nook would have let her know this.

                                     

                                    I got my Nook primarily for the purpose of checking out library books.   Due to personal circumstances, it was very difficult for me to get to the library, and at the time, I couldn't afford to buy regular books often enough to "feed" my reading habit.   But I knew from the get-go, that buying e-books was mostly out of the question for me.   No way in heck would I EVER spend $12, $14 or more on a digital file, that I don't even truly own.   Shoot, I can't even see myself spending $5 on an e-book, to be honest.   To ME - it is NOT worth it.   If I wanted to spend money on a book, there are many sources to get very good-to-mint condition hardcovers at little cost.

                                     

                                    But that's just *me*.   I dearly love "real books", almost obsessively so --  and e-books will never replace them for me.  E-books are simply an "extra" way of reading, something to supplement during the times that I've run out of other choices - but if given the choice between a hardcover & an e-book, I'll take the hardcover every time.

                                     

                                    Someone mentioned the convenience of taking 1000's of books with you.   That *sounds* good - but where do you ever go, that you need to have massive numbers of books at hand?   Even though I read a minimum of several hours a night --- when I go on vacation or away from home, I might take 3 or 4 books with me at the most, depending on how long I'll be away.   Is it really that hard to select what you want to read while you're away from home for a little while, that you need your entire library with you?   I'm NOT criticizing at all - but I honestly do not understand the "need" to have your entire library with you if you are leaving home for a while.   Wouldn't just a few books suit the purpose?   (Again, not meant as criticism - I just would never feel the need to have every book I owned with me, no matter where I was going...)

                                     

                                    To each their own -- as long as there are enough people willing to pay equal prices for e-books, they will continue to sell at those prices -- and prices will probably continue to rise until when/if the day comes, that people start balking at the prices.   I know that *I* personally will never pay more than maybe $3 for an e-book --- but that's because it's not worth it to me, but to someone else, if it IS worth it, that's their option -- again - to each their own.  Some people pay $300-400 for a pair of 'designer' blue jeans & think they're worth it -- I'll stick with my "cheap" jeans.  LOL!    But on a few rare (very rare!) occasions, I've paid over $100 for one somewhat rare book ("real book") that was important to me - to *me*, it was well worth it.  

                                     

                                    I DO love my Nook --- I've had a great time with library books, free books, and have found additional uses for it as well, so I am very glad I got it.   But I still will always love my home library full of "real" books, and will continue to expand it as much as possible.   A digital file cannot replace a lovely leather-bound classic - the look, the feel, the smell......   There's just something about "real books" that e-ink will never replace, for me.   But that doesn't mean I cannot enjoy plenty of free books on my Nook, and using it for PDF's of my crochet patterns & other such things - it's turned out to be more useful than I even thought it would be.

                                     

                                     

                                      • Re: E-book buyers UNITE against outrageous prices for ebooks! Call for 90-day moritorium.
                                        Ya_Ya

                                         


                                        ferretlady4719 wrote:

                                         

                                        Someone mentioned the convenience of taking 1000's of books with you.   That *sounds* good - but where do you ever go, that you need to have massive numbers of books at hand?   Even though I read a minimum of several hours a night --- when I go on vacation or away from home, I might take 3 or 4 books with me at the most, depending on how long I'll be away.   Is it really that hard to select what you want to read while you're away from home for a little while, that you need your entire library with you?  

                                         


                                        Maybe it isn't if you only travel for leisure and only occasionally.  I so, so, so, so wish I'd looked into ereaders when I had my last job.  (I couldn't justify the basically $300 price point and had no idea they'd come down in price so much)  I travelled about 40% of the time.  Trips often came up with less than 24 hours notice.  Just rearranging meetings and gathering the work things I'd need because I was going to be away from the office was harrying enough.  Packing clothes, annoying.  Then to go get the books I was going to want?  I usually grabbed a few, but they often ended up being not what I wanted to read.  Then I'd either be annoyed and end up watching mindless TV or I'd buy more books - which cost me money I didn't need to spend and I then had to find room in the already full carry-on and laptop bag.

                                         

                                        I very often assumed I wouldn't be up to much more than fluff after a location visit - and sometimes I was right, but just as often I was wrong.  Or, I'd bring a "real" book and realize that the day had sucked and all I could handle was Stephen King.

                                         

                                        I didn't need 1,000s of books, but having a selection of 50 would have been fabulous.  Add the ability to not even think about "What to read?" when I was packing at the last moment and it would have been even fabulouser.  And, allowing me to buy a book at the airport without one more thing to carry?  I'd have been the happiest employee ever.