26 Replies Latest reply on Dec 21, 2012 7:38 PM by boomer1949

    A little disappointed in some prices

    JenScheil

      I have been buying my books (to include Nook books) for the last 2-3 years now and have mainly switched over to the Nook since it is easier with traveling since I am in the military. I have been checking the series that I read (this one was Sookie Stackhouse) and I noticed that the electronic book is the SAME price as the paperback....! I was shocked. Normally they are at least cheaper by cents or even a few dollars. I can't justify buying the latest books now....and it sucks. What stinks is as I am serching through the rest of the series that I read, I am seeing a trend in this...!

        • Re: A little disappointed in some prices
          geertm

          JenScheil wrote:

          I have been buying my books (to include Nook books) for the last 2-3 years now and have mainly switched over to the Nook since it is easier with traveling since I am in the military. I have been checking the series that I read (this one was Sookie Stackhouse) and I noticed that the electronic book is the SAME price as the paperback....! I was shocked. Normally they are at least cheaper by cents or even a few dollars. I can't justify buying the latest books now....and it sucks. What stinks is as I am serching through the rest of the series that I read, I am seeing a trend in this...!


          Search for information about the agency model.

          The publisher sets the price for these  books, which B&N is not allowed to discount in any way. The books will have the same price at any bookstore.

          • Re: A little disappointed in some prices
            keriflur

            The Sookie Stackhouse series is published by Penguin, who's been getting pricing wrong since the agency model went into effect.  I'm not sure if they're trying to drive traffic to DTBs or if they just don't understand how most of us shop.  I'd offer to lend them to you, but Penguin doesn't allow that either.

             

            Best bet, IMO, is to buy a gently used paperback.

              • Re: A little disappointed in some prices
                bklvr896

                keriflur wrote:

                The Sookie Stackhouse series is published by Penguin, who's been getting pricing wrong since the agency model went into effect.  I'm not sure if they're trying to drive traffic to DTBs or if they just don't understand how most of us shop.  I'd offer to lend them to you, but Penguin doesn't allow that either.

                 

                Best bet, IMO, is to buy a gently used paperback.


                I sometimes think the foks at at Penguin who price the books are smoking something since their pricing is absurd. Example is this Seaside Knitters Series. Book 1 - 11.99 Book 2 - 12.99 Book 3 - 11.99 Book 4 - 9.99 Book 5 - 9.99 Book 6 - 11.99 Until book 6, They were never released in HC. Penguin publishes a lot of authors I like, but as long as their pricing is irrational, I've been not buying.
                  • Re: A little disappointed in some prices
                    kamas716

                    bklvr896 wrote:

                    I sometimes think the foks at at Penguin who price the books are smoking something since their pricing is absurd. Example is this Seaside Knitters Series. Book 1 - 11.99 Book 2 - 12.99 Book 3 - 11.99 Book 4 - 9.99 Book 5 - 9.99 Book 6 - 11.99 Until book 6, They were never released in HC. Penguin publishes a lot of authors I like, but as long as their pricing is irrational, I've been not buying.

                    The William Kent Krueger books published by Pocket Star have a similarly irrational pricing scheme.

                • Re: A little disappointed in some prices
                  JenScheil

                  Thank you for letting me know that about the Penguin books...I had no idea...honestly I normally just make sure the price is cheaper then I buy it if it isn't then I don't...! It is very frustrating though that this publisher has seemingly missed the concept point of e-books....I love them bc I am not cumulating a stack of books or wasting paper...just wish they had a set scale fro pricing across the board, though that will probably never happen!

                  • Re: A little disappointed in some prices
                    Irishelf

                    I think this is why I dislike the agency model so much.  I tend to like animal fantasy (especially cats) and dystopian fiction, which often means young adult books (since I abhor erotica).  And most young  adult books are published by the big six!  You would think that publishers would encourage young adults to read, but with most young adult books starting at $9.99 that's more likely to discourage them (since most young adults, if working at all, earn only minimum wage).  I find it interesting that comics, romance books and erotica tend to be free or cheap, while good books (like some of the classics still under a patent) tend to coast $9.99 or more.  I mean really, $13.99 for Watership Down!  Unreal!

                    • Re: A little disappointed in some prices
                      AikiPen

                      Yeah, the prices are disappointing. I have several books in my wish list that are not published by the big 6 so prices are being set by B&N. Just before summer B&N cranked the prices they could set, not by much. Many of the 9.99 books on my list are now 10.18, 10.36. It irks me, it is just the point that irks me. A recent Rick Riordan children's book is 9.99 at the other large online seller, but it is 10.00 at B&N. Okay, I know, just a penny, but it is the point.

                       

                      I check the 400 books on my wish list regularly and often find books I want at used bookstores or the library sale. I buy them there and Penguin (or whoever) doesn't get first sale, unfortunately the author does not get a cut either. After I'm done with the used books I put them on our Bookcrossing shelf at my dojo. Sometimes I think the publishers don't have a clue, but they obviously think the current model is working for them. They won't change if they don't get the message.

                       

                      On the other side of things, with the prices going up my local used bookstores are getting more of my business as well as my library. I'm buying less ebooks and using the library more. What goes around comes around.

                      • Re: A little disappointed in some prices
                        patgolfneb
                        I think they get it. They are trying to slow the transition to e books, and use the e book sales to cover p book losses. We see e books as a separate business market. They see it as one business with 2 sales channels. I am sure they have contacts with printers, shipping firms, even authors worried about profitable hardcover sales lost, all in their ears about how this is harming them.
                          • Re: A little disappointed in some prices
                            Personally, I see e-books as the same business market, without the insanely high costs of printing. In other words, if they're selling e-books at or near the price of a printed book, the profit margins are extremely high.

                            Additionally, as is the case with nearly all digital vs. physical publishing models, the factors that normally drive prices down in physical models just aren't there in digital models. More often than not I end up buying a physical copy of a book because it goes on sale or ends up in a used book store before the ebook becomes reasonably priced. This is especially true with the publishers that can't seem to coordinate a drop in ebook price when the paperback is released.
                              • Re: A little disappointed in some prices
                                Agreed, but as consumers pay the exorbitant prices for ebooks, they'll sell them all day like that. I myself have set a $9.99 ceiling on ebook prices for me to purchase. Nothing magical about $9.99.
                                • Re: A little disappointed in some prices
                                  bklvr896

                                  vizeroth wrote:
                                  Personally, I see e-books as the same business market, without the insanely high costs of printing. In other words, if they're selling e-books at or near the price of a printed book, the profit margins are extremely high.

                                  Additionally, as is the case with nearly all digital vs. physical publishing models, the factors that normally drive prices down in physical models just aren't there in digital models. More often than not I end up buying a physical copy of a book because it goes on sale or ends up in a used book store before the ebook becomes reasonably priced. This is especially true with the publishers that can't seem to coordinate a drop in ebook price when the paperback is released.

                                  The printing costs have been discussed a lot here, and everything published, newspaper articles, etc, put the printing costs at about 12% of the total cost of the book.  Factor in that there are costs associated with creating and distributing the ebook, it doesn't appear that the cost of printing is that significant to make the profit margins "extremely high".  Honestly, in most areas, the material costs (in this case the paper, ink, etc) are not the significant cost in producing an item.  It's the labor and overhead, which includes the editors, account executives, marketing costs, etc, that make up the bulk of the costs.  A simplistic example is home improvement projects, I can buy a toilet for $100, but it's going to cost me about $250 to have someone install that toilet.

                                   

                                  Most owners of ereaders that I know have pretty much quit buying printed books, as have I, and they don't seem to be put off by the price of the books.  At least some of the people who post here tend to be more aware of prices, but, represent an extremely small percentage of all users.  If users were that upset about the prices, then ebooks wouldn't be selling at the rates they are or have been.

                                   

                                   

                                    • Re: A little disappointed in some prices
                                      deesy58

                                      bklvr896 wrote:

                                      vizeroth wrote:
                                      Personally, I see e-books as the same business market, without the insanely high costs of printing. In other words, if they're selling e-books at or near the price of a printed book, the profit margins are extremely high.

                                      Additionally, as is the case with nearly all digital vs. physical publishing models, the factors that normally drive prices down in physical models just aren't there in digital models. More often than not I end up buying a physical copy of a book because it goes on sale or ends up in a used book store before the ebook becomes reasonably priced. This is especially true with the publishers that can't seem to coordinate a drop in ebook price when the paperback is released.

                                      The printing costs have been discussed a lot here, and everything published, newspaper articles, etc, put the printing costs at about 12% of the total cost of the book.  Factor in that there are costs associated with creating and distributing the ebook, it doesn't appear that the cost of printing is that significant to make the profit margins "extremely high".  Honestly, in most areas, the material costs (in this case the paper, ink, etc) are not the significant cost in producing an item.  It's the labor and overhead, which includes the editors, account executives, marketing costs, etc, that make up the bulk of the costs.  A simplistic example is home improvement projects, I can buy a toilet for $100, but it's going to cost me about $250 to have someone install that toilet.

                                       

                                      Most owners of ereaders that I know have pretty much quit buying printed books, as have I, and they don't seem to be put off by the price of the books.  At least some of the people who post here tend to be more aware of prices, but, represent an extremely small percentage of all users.  If users were that upset about the prices, then ebooks wouldn't be selling at the rates they are or have been.

                                       

                                       


                                      If we accept your assumptions about the 12% cost of printing, and just ignore the costs of distribution and storage, where does that money go if not to the bottom-line profits of the publisher?  Is it unreasonable for consumers to expect to share in the benefits of new technologies?  Why shouldn't the cost savings (or at least some of the cost savings) associated with the transition from paper and ink books to e-books be passed along to consumers? 

                                       

                                      Oh, right ... corporate greed!  :smileysad:

                                        • Re: A little disappointed in some prices
                                          bklvr896

                                          deesy58 wrote:

                                          bklvr896 wrote:

                                          vizeroth wrote:
                                          Personally, I see e-books as the same business market, without the insanely high costs of printing. In other words, if they're selling e-books at or near the price of a printed book, the profit margins are extremely high.

                                          Additionally, as is the case with nearly all digital vs. physical publishing models, the factors that normally drive prices down in physical models just aren't there in digital models. More often than not I end up buying a physical copy of a book because it goes on sale or ends up in a used book store before the ebook becomes reasonably priced. This is especially true with the publishers that can't seem to coordinate a drop in ebook price when the paperback is released.

                                          The printing costs have been discussed a lot here, and everything published, newspaper articles, etc, put the printing costs at about 12% of the total cost of the book.  Factor in that there are costs associated with creating and distributing the ebook, it doesn't appear that the cost of printing is that significant to make the profit margins "extremely high".  Honestly, in most areas, the material costs (in this case the paper, ink, etc) are not the significant cost in producing an item.  It's the labor and overhead, which includes the editors, account executives, marketing costs, etc, that make up the bulk of the costs.  A simplistic example is home improvement projects, I can buy a toilet for $100, but it's going to cost me about $250 to have someone install that toilet.

                                           

                                          Most owners of ereaders that I know have pretty much quit buying printed books, as have I, and they don't seem to be put off by the price of the books.  At least some of the people who post here tend to be more aware of prices, but, represent an extremely small percentage of all users.  If users were that upset about the prices, then ebooks wouldn't be selling at the rates they are or have been.

                                           

                                           


                                          If we accept your assumptions about the 12% cost of printing, and just ignore the costs of distribution and storage, where does that money go if not to the bottom-line profits of the publisher?  Is it unreasonable for consumers to expect to share in the benefits of new technologies?  Why shouldn't the cost savings (or at least some of the cost savings) associated with the transition from paper and ink books to e-books be passed along to consumers? 

                                           

                                          Oh, right ... corporate greed!  :smileysad:


                                          Why is making a profit always considered corporate greed?  None of us know how much profit a publisher makes off a book, be it printed or eBook.  And you can't just ignore storage and distribution, that's a cost, that's going to reduce the 12% or so down to a lower level.  And no one knows how much the storage and distribution costs are.  While servers and storage may be cheap, labor, in the form of IT to keep things up and running, monitor the systems, perform necessary upgrades, etc generally isn't all that cheap.  Labor to print the books will most likely be cheaper, so there's no way to determine how much of the lack of printing and storage costs are offset by other costs.  It's all assumptions on all our parts, unless we work in the publishing industry and are involved in the process.  

                                           

                                           

                                            • Re: A little disappointed in some prices
                                              deesy58

                                              bklvr896 wrote:

                                              deesy58 wrote:

                                              bklvr896 wrote:

                                              vizeroth wrote:
                                              Personally, I see e-books as the same business market, without the insanely high costs of printing. In other words, if they're selling e-books at or near the price of a printed book, the profit margins are extremely high.

                                              Additionally, as is the case with nearly all digital vs. physical publishing models, the factors that normally drive prices down in physical models just aren't there in digital models. More often than not I end up buying a physical copy of a book because it goes on sale or ends up in a used book store before the ebook becomes reasonably priced. This is especially true with the publishers that can't seem to coordinate a drop in ebook price when the paperback is released.

                                              The printing costs have been discussed a lot here, and everything published, newspaper articles, etc, put the printing costs at about 12% of the total cost of the book.  Factor in that there are costs associated with creating and distributing the ebook, it doesn't appear that the cost of printing is that significant to make the profit margins "extremely high".  Honestly, in most areas, the material costs (in this case the paper, ink, etc) are not the significant cost in producing an item.  It's the labor and overhead, which includes the editors, account executives, marketing costs, etc, that make up the bulk of the costs.  A simplistic example is home improvement projects, I can buy a toilet for $100, but it's going to cost me about $250 to have someone install that toilet.

                                               

                                              Most owners of ereaders that I know have pretty much quit buying printed books, as have I, and they don't seem to be put off by the price of the books.  At least some of the people who post here tend to be more aware of prices, but, represent an extremely small percentage of all users.  If users were that upset about the prices, then ebooks wouldn't be selling at the rates they are or have been.

                                               

                                               


                                              If we accept your assumptions about the 12% cost of printing, and just ignore the costs of distribution and storage, where does that money go if not to the bottom-line profits of the publisher?  Is it unreasonable for consumers to expect to share in the benefits of new technologies?  Why shouldn't the cost savings (or at least some of the cost savings) associated with the transition from paper and ink books to e-books be passed along to consumers? 

                                               

                                              Oh, right ... corporate greed!  :smileysad:


                                              Why is making a profit always considered corporate greed?  None of us know how much profit a publisher makes off a book, be it printed or eBook.  And you can't just ignore storage and distribution, that's a cost, that's going to reduce the 12% or so down to a lower level.  And no one knows how much the storage and distribution costs are.  While servers and storage may be cheap, labor, in the form of IT to keep things up and running, monitor the systems, perform necessary upgrades, etc generally isn't all that cheap.  Labor to print the books will most likely be cheaper, so there's no way to determine how much of the lack of printing and storage costs are offset by other costs.  It's all assumptions on all our parts, unless we work in the publishing industry and are involved in the process.  

                                               

                                               


                                              Umm ... actually, no.  The cost of storage and distribution, when added to the already assumed 12% cost of printing and materials would raise the cost to a higher level, not a lower one.  As far as profits are concerned, reasonable levels of profits have been available to American businesses since the founding of our Republic.  It has only been in the past thirty years or so that no amount of profit is ever considered adequate by US corporations.  That's nothing more than simple greed.  Do you really believe that the publishing industry is entitled to higher ROS levels today than they were in the past?  If so, why are they entitled to such higher rates of return? 

                                               

                                              We don't need to work in the publishing industry to be able to use our common sense to determine that an intangible product like an e-book MUST cost less to produce and distribute than physical books. 

                                    • Re: A little disappointed in some prices
                                      patgolfneb

                                      When does profit become greed? When a few at the top get rich and average employees make less and less.

                                       

                                      The cost issue comparison by those claiming a modest advantage restricts itself to a newly published book.

                                       

                                      The cost advantage of e books grows the longer a book is offered. These sales allow original editing, royalty advances etc to be amortized over a longer period. Risk is lower, no minimum print runs and unsold books. Marginal costs for additional sales beyond authors royalties and retailers share are nominal.  This means that although publishers are squeezed by the need to support multiple distribution channels over time there are substantial cost savings as a higher share of books are sold as e books Of course the competition for dollars from used paper books is also reduced.

                                      Bottom line ebooks can be sold for longer without large up front costs for printing shipping, in smaller numbers for a much longer time profitably, this advantage grows as a larger percentage of books sold are e books.
                                      • Re: A little disappointed in some prices
                                        Irishelf

                                        The main problem with most businesses is the big difference between what people at the the top  (CEOs, Admin., etc) make and the rest of the employees make.  Plus, when regular employees mess up, they are punished in some way (demoted, fired, docked pay,etc.) but when CEOs mess up, not only are they not punished, but often still get bonuses which they should not be entitled to!

                                        • Re: A little disappointed in some prices
                                          Why do you keep paying the exorbitant prices? They will sell it all day that way. Hit them in the wallet.
                                            • Re: A little disappointed in some prices

                                              Yes, this is the key thing.

                                               

                                              WE have some percentage of readers who either can't wait or don't care. That makes it viable for Publishers to keep charging prices that are higher than what would be a reasonable win-win situation/solution.

                                               

                                              All we need is for most readers to say - If it's priced unfairly I'll wait till it's fine.

                                               

                                              You can't blame publsihers for taking advantag eof people's lack of patience. They are a business after all and convenience and immediate availability is, sort of, a product.

                                            • Re: A little disappointed in some prices
                                              There are MANY great FREE books available from BN for your Nook Color! I have found several authors I never heard of and now LOVE!!! Not ALL great books are best sellers! Search for free downloads for Nook Color or whatever you have! There are literally thousands of free titles! Good hunting!!! :smileyhappy:)) Also your public library is a GREAT place for EBOOKS! I read all the Stackhouse books for FREE!!!