9 Replies Latest reply on Oct 14, 2014 7:24 AM by LarryOnLI
      • Re: Simon and Schuster Offers (some) DRM-Free eBooks
        MacMcK1957

        I would be very interested to see some publishers and distributors try watermarking, and see if they could actually then trace the origin of any books showing up on pirate sites.  I have no intention of sharing books online, but I would sure prefer to be able to move files from device to device without having to jump through hoops.

          • Re: Simon and Schuster Offers (some) DRM-Free eBooks
            keriflur

            I *think* the problem with watermarking is that once a person gets inside a file, they can easily remove it. Given that the current pirates are tech-savvy enough to strip DRM, they should be tech-savvy enough to remove watermarking.

             

            That said, even if it makes absolutely no improvements in decreasing rates of pirating, if it makes the lives of consumers easier, and it does, then it should be adopted.

              • Re: Simon and Schuster Offers (some) DRM-Free eBooks
                MacMcK1957

                I think there might be ways to work around that.  And frankly, most people are too lazy to even bother.  That's the way they nabbed that character actor who was selling his screening copies of blockbuster movies.

                • Re: Simon and Schuster Offers (some) DRM-Free eBooks
                  LarryOnLI

                  keriflur wrote:

                   

                  I *think* the problem with watermarking is that once a person gets inside a file, they can easily remove it. Given that the current pirates are tech-savvy enough to strip DRM, they should be tech-savvy enough to remove watermarking.

                   

                  That said, even if it makes absolutely no improvements in decreasing rates of pirating, if it makes the lives of consumers easier, and it does, then it should be adopted.

                  Stripping watermarking is not as easy as you might think.

                   

                  The book file remains encrypted, and altering the watermark changes the checksum in the book and renders it Un-decryptable.

                   

                  Of course this won't stop the truly skilled people from being able to strip or alter the watermark, but it increases the challenge level.

                   

                  Also there could be multiple watermarks in a file (one placed there by the publisher and one by the book seller), or multiple watermarks placed in the file by the bookseller, so when the pirate strips out one, there is another they don't know to look for.

                   

                  Watermarks can be very subtle, if you don't know one is there, how would you know to look for it.

                   

                  ETA: I've switched from threaded to flat view, I find it just works better for me and that is why I've gone back to quoting the post I'm replying to. I hope others decide to do the same.

              • Re: Simon and Schuster Offers (some) DRM-Free eBooks
                Mercury_Glitch

                Gotta agree with MacMcK1957 most folks who strip DRM do it because DRM prevents them from reading the ebook on other devices and/or sharing the ebook to piracy sites.  If there's nothing preventing that from happening they wont bother.  At least not until people start getting nabbed for it. 

                 

                Clearly DRM of any sort, aside from maybe Apples (has someone cracked that?) stops piracy.  So the only options are drop DRM since it's effectively useless and while it may not increase costs much, the costs combined with potential lost sales is probably something pubs don't like.

                 

                I suspect the only reason there's a cling to DRM because it stops -some- people.  Just not anyone who can google the term 'remove drm', combined with the lack of a cost of trying to put out new DRM schemes every time someone cracks the current one.  Which, I think, was a major contributor to the music industry ditching it.  The cost of the fight plus the losses to piracy were greater than just the piracy since as soon as a new scheme was released it was broken within a week if not less, likewise for DVDs (though I think the movie industry is still putting up a fight with DRM).