18 Replies Latest reply on Nov 14, 2014 4:31 AM by Froide
      • Re: Why do you read on your phone?
        LarryOnLI

        I very rarely read on my phone, I find reading on a small screen much less enjoyable.

         

        There are only two times I read on my phone. The first is when the battery on my iPad dies while I am away from a charger. The second is when I find myself forced to wait unexpectedly. If I am going somewhere that I know I will need to wait I bring my iPad.

         

        On those rare occasions when I must switch to my phone to read, the B&N syncing of my place in the book works very well. Unless I am switching to my phone because my iPad battery died while I was reading, in that case my phone will open the book up to 5 pages earlier than the point I had reached.

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        • Re: Why do you read on your phone?
          keriflur

          I'm similar to Larry in that if I know I'm going to wait, I've got my preferred reading device (in my case, e-ink) with me. But sometimes I forget, or I'm caught by a long line at the local pharmacy, in which case I read on my phone.

           

          As I don't have always-on sync, and never did, even when I was fully in the nook ecosystem, I usually finish my current chapter on my phone before switching back to my KPW.

           

          If I'm reading a how-to book, like something on code or an application, I read those solely on my ipad and never switch to my phone.

          • Re: Why do you read on your phone?
            MacMcK1957

            I use my phone to read the paper at lunch when I'm at work. I subscribe through B&N, so I have the Chicago Tribune wherever I have a Nook app, and I don't normally carry my Nook with me.

             

            Aside from that, pretty much only in waiting rooms.  Dentist, doctor, barber, oil change, etc.  Beats reading the old People magazines about how Kim K's marriage to that basketball player may be on the rocks.  How'd that work out for her?

            • Re: Why do you read on your phone?
              wistaggerlee

              I almost never read on my phone.  I turn of the wifi on my nook when I don't need it, so I'm never in sync. 

              • Re: Why do you read on your phone?
                bobstro

                Because I look silly taking my laptop into the bathroom.

                 

                I do enjoy reading on other people's phones. There's nothing like walking up behind them and reading their emails to get a conversation started.

                 

                Shouldn't the question be: "Why do you carry a phone so big you can read books on it comfortably?"

                There are nearly 7 billion mobile subscriptions worldwide in 2014, according to estimates The International Telecommunication Union. This is equivalent to 95.5% of the world population. Tablet sales so far in 2014 have only accounted for 270.7 million units.

                So wait... How are those supposed to be related? The CUMULATIVE number of active phone subscriptions is ~7bn, yet we're only comparing tablet sales THIS YEAR? Those are hardly mutually exclusive factors, not to mention that some poor souls are saddled with 2 (or more) cell phones. No doubt mobile phone subscribers outnumber tablet owners by a large factor, but this is really bad math in search of a headline.

                [...] Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Kobo, Oyster, and Scribd all report that its their Android and iOS apps that get the most traction and they are all primarily optimized for smartphones.

                Wait... I thought eink owners were where B&N gets the most traction.

                [...] These companies realize that that is that their audience are using the most to buy and read digital books or fan-fiction.

                I'd like to read an equally breathless blog post pointing out that bloggers can't write good.

                  • Re: Why do you read on your phone?
                    keriflur

                    I've read that last quote three times now and I still can't make it make sense. Lol.

                     

                    B&N only said that people who own e-ink devices buy the most content, not that the most reading happens on e-ink devices (AFAIK). However, since e-ink owners often do not leave their WiFi on, I'm not sure B&N gets accurate numbers on how much e-ink owners read on their e-ink devices. Phones are generally always connected.

                      • Re: Why do you read on your phone?
                        LarryOnLI

                        keriflur wrote:

                         

                        I've read that last quote three times now and I still can't make it make sense. Lol.

                         

                        B&N only said that people who own e-ink devices buy the most content, not that the most reading happens on e-ink devices (AFAIK). However, since e-ink owners often do not leave their WiFi on, I'm not sure B&N gets accurate numbers on how much e-ink owners read on their e-ink devices. Phones are generally always connected.

                        I think it's more a case of: eInk owners buy more books than owners of LCD devices, however owners of LCD devices far outnumber owners of eInk devices, so overall they account for more revenue.

                          • Re: Why do you read on your phone?
                            bobstro

                            And may be one in the same individual in many cases. Of course, GoodEReader's data probably isn't any better.

                            • Re: Why do you read on your phone?
                              MacMcK1957

                              I think it's been shown that e-ink owners will buy a lot more books (per user, of course) but they may do their reading on multiple devices.  I will read on my phone if I have nothing else with me.  I will read enhanced content on a tablet.  I will read most "basic" reading material on my e-ink reader.

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                                • Re: Why do you read on your phone?
                                  keriflur

                                  MacMcK1957 wrote:

                                   

                                  I think it's been shown that e-ink owners will buy a lot more books (per user, of course) but they may do their reading on multiple devices.  I will read on my phone if I have nothing else with me.  I will read enhanced content on a tablet.  I will read most "basic" reading material on my e-ink reader.

                                  THIS.

                                  I suspect that most e-ink owners also have phones and computers, a large percentage of them have smartphones, and a good chunk also own a tablet. It's only logical that the reading they do would be spread a bit across devices.

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                                    • Re: Why do you read on your phone?
                                      bobstro

                                      That's what Kobo seems to "get". Their emphasis is on readers who use multiple devices rather than any one proprietary or general-purpose device. This is why I think B&N's recent "no downloads" policy is foolish. Who cares what people read on so long as they're buying?

                                        • Re: Why do you read on your phone?
                                          Byteguy

                                          Kobo has the same "no download" thing going as B&N.  I went to buy a new book in a popular series and, despite being listed as available to read on Desktop, Tablets, and Windows, it was ONLY available as a wi-fi push to the Kobo Tablets or into their own reading apps.  No ADE download at all.

                                           

                                          I called them and they said it was "because the publisher only gave them an ePub3 file."

                                           

                                          They said there was no way to know for sure before buying a book if there was an ADE Download version.  One rep said I should look for "Blackberry" in the list of devices. But, I've been testing that by getting BookBub free books and none of them have said they were for Blackberry and the three books I "bought" have all been downloadable.

                                           

                                          Unfortunately, I can't trust Kobo with a purchase that costs money.  I had to fight them to give me the money back for the book I bought and couldn't get.  They said they would refund, emailed me that they were processing the refund,  then emailed me that I was only going to get a Kobo credit, then agreed to a refund when I called them AGAIN and made them read their own email to me, then had to wait another two weeks for the credit to show.

                                           

                                          I read on my Nook Glow, my phone, and my Nexus 7.  I have to have side-loadable files.  I've switched to buying most of my books from Google and just sometimes ordering from B&N (and I'll stop buying from B&N if they block the Nook for PC program).

                                            • Re: Why do you read on your phone?
                                              keriflur

                                              Byteguy wrote:

                                              One rep said I should look for "Blackberry" in the list of devices. But, I've been testing that by getting BookBub free books and none of them have said they were for Blackberry and the three books I "bought" have all been downloadable.

                                              I've heard the Blackberry thing too. I think it's safe to assume that if BB is listed, the book WILL be downloadable. If the book doesn't list BB, you're taking a chance, and given how <sarcasm> spectacular </sarcasm> Kobo CS is, it's probably not a risk worth taking.

                                               

                                              Byteguy wrote:

                                               

                                              Unfortunately, I can't trust Kobo with a purchase that costs money.  I had to fight them to give me the money back for the book I bought and couldn't get.  They said they would refund, emailed me that they were processing the refund,  then emailed me that I was only going to get a Kobo credit, then agreed to a refund when I called them AGAIN and made them read their own email to me, then had to wait another two weeks for the credit to show.

                                              This is par for the course with Kobo - their CS is terrible.

                                               

                                              I buy from Google also - I've never called their CS, so I've no idea if they're competent or not. I did get one bum book from them - it was missing all the m-dashes, and it was by an author who used a lot of them. I just bought the book again from B&N rather than calling Google CS. I was a bit concerned that when I checked the Google read-online view to see if the issue had been fixed (before buying from B&N), it hadn't, and the book had been out for a couple of years (and was from a NYT bestselling author, so their should have been lots of people buying it). It made me wonder if they maybe don't sell all that many books, or don't bother to fix issues when folks report them.

                                              • Re: Why do you read on your phone?
                                                bobstro

                                                The Kobo issue is of an entirely different scale. Some titles -- a small percentage -- are affected. As noted, this is the call of the publisher, not Kobo. Kobo's actions wouldn't prevent you from accessing prior purchases at a later date. Not the same thing at all.

                                                 

                                                I did have one Kobo title that would not download. I emailed Kobo about the issue. After a week of no communication, they credited my account.

                                                 

                                                I agree Kobo's CS sucks (though seems to be slowly improving), and they do need to fix the format notification thing. They're hardly perfect. They are making nice devices, and they don't seem to be going out of the way to make my life difficult. They're still my favorite branded eInk ereader.

                                                 

                                                I've had no issues buying ebooks from Google. Their reader app isn't great, though the "upload any non-DRM epub" option is nice. I'd love a generic eInk tablet, but the Onyx T62 didn't impress me after reading a few reviews.