7 Replies Latest reply on Jul 29, 2015 10:23 PM by cmconn
      • Re: B&N Names Frederic Argir As Head of E-Commerce, Nook
        DeanGibson

        Well, after B&N's brilliant start, most people seem to agree that B&N's first big mistake was not adopting the Android Market Google Play Store early enough.

         

        In my opinion, their second big mistake (especially after adding the Android Market Google Play Store to the HD line) was the fire-sale of the HD line.  While this may have been done for inventory write-down (tax or investor reasons), I think it sent the wrong message:  That B&N didn't know where it was going.

         

        I don't have a problem with the Samsung Nooks;  it was a natural move, given the market. It's the way the HD line was demoted (quickly moved to end-of-life status).  B&N did an excellent job in investing in the development of the Nook hardware, but their refusal to fix common (even stupid) bugs showed their reluctance to invest in first-class software.  Orphaning your software has a bigger impact that orphaning hardware, especially when the latter is better than the former.  And now we have Nook PC products that have been orphaned.

         

        I don't necessarily agree with the conclusion of the news article.  However, assuming that B&N completely ditches the e-book market, what will happen?  Who will buy the obligations of the Nook servers?  The obvious choice would be Amazon, although that might be blocked by the US DoJ.  Whoever would do it, would have to provide a continuing e-book market and support.  Are the other Amazon competitors surviving enough to take the step?

         

        What about the publishers?  Just like MasterCard was formed by banks to offer a counterpoint to Bank of America's VISA card (and like VHS as a counterpoint to Sony's BETA), the publishers could form a consortium to do that with the Nook.  It would be in their interest as a counterpoint to Amazon, and it would add stability to the eBook market.

          • Re: B&N Names Frederic Argir As Head of E-Commerce, Nook
            MacMcK1957

            Who will buy the obligations of the Nook servers?  The obvious choice would be Amazon, although that might be blocked by the US DoJ.

             

            Amazon has gone all in on their proprietary e-book format.  I can't see them supporting EPUB in any way.  If anyone is going to keep that market alive it has to be someone with enough muscle to compete with Amazon.  The only candidate I can see is Google, somehow merging the Nook server business (and existing libraries) into Google Play books.

              • Re: B&N Names Frederic Argir As Head of E-Commerce, Nook
                LarryOnLI

                Amazon could buy the NOOK customer list and provide libraries in their native format.

                 

                I think the majority of NOOK users have tablets anyway, and would just need to download the kindle app. This is of course just my opinion, I have no numbers to back it up.

                 

                Theoretically, the NOOK customer list might even be large enough to justify Amazon developing a software update for existing e-ink NOOKs to allow them to read/download from Amazon. That is a long shot in my opinion, but not totally outside the realm of possibility.

                  • Re: B&N Names Frederic Argir As Head of E-Commerce, Nook
                    MacMcK1957

                    I am one of the Nook users who has tablets.  I've even read a few Kindle e-books from my wife's library (not many, our tastes don't overlap much).  But for the vast majority of my reading I still depend on my e-ink Nooks.  It would be a pretty major software update to revamp existing Nooks to handle AZW files, in addition to the EPUB files that are already there.  Not totally impossible but I would consider it unlikely in the extreme.

                      • Re: B&N Names Frederic Argir As Head of E-Commerce, Nook
                        LarryOnLI

                        Well I said it was a long shot.

                         

                        Much more likely scenario?

                         

                        If B&N decides to discontinue/sell the NOOK business, I think that Amazon is the only one with an interest and deep enough pockets to acquire it.

                         

                        My version of it is as follows:

                         

                        1) Amazon acquires NOOK customer list.

                        2) Amazon provides every title in your NOOK library in Kindle format in their cloud.

                        3) Users are informed they can read their Kindle books online (web browser), in the Kindle app, or buy a Kindle

                        4) Amazon offers Kindles at a (hopefully significant) discount to NOOK customers

                        5) B&N announces date when NOOK will be shutdown and advises customers to download all their content if they want to keep it in epub format.

                        6) B&N enables NOOK branded tablets to access Amazon app store (is this even necessary anymore?)

                         

                        result:

                         

                        1) Amazon get a lot of new customers

                        2) People who read NOOK content online or tablets/phones will read online at Amazon or download the Kindle app

                        3) People who read on their computer will download the kindle app

                        4) People who read on a NOOK eink device will either trade-in for a kindle, or just download all their content to the NOOK and continue using it till it dies.

                         

                         

                        Neither B&N nor Amazon will give two s***s for your sideloaded e-pubs from other sources.

                          • Re: B&N Names Frederic Argir As Head of E-Commerce, Nook
                            DeanGibson

                            LarryOnLI:

                             

                            ...

                             

                            Much more likely scenario?

                             

                            If B&N decides to discontinue/sell the NOOK business, I think that Amazon is the only one with an interest and deep enough pockets to acquire it.

                             

                            My version of it is as follows:

                             

                            1) Amazon acquires NOOK customer list.

                            2) Amazon provides every title in your NOOK library in Kindle format in their cloud.

                            3) Users are informed they can read their Kindle books online (web browser), in the Kindle app, or buy a Kindle

                            4) Amazon offers Kindles at a (hopefully significant) discount to NOOK customers

                            5) B&N announces date when NOOK will be shutdown and advises customers to download all their content if they want to keep it in epub format.

                            6) B&N enables NOOK branded tablets to access Amazon app store (is this even necessary anymore?)

                             

                            ...

                             

                            Your #1-4 was exactly the scenario I was thinking of.  Mac mentioned Google, which I forgot about;  they could do #1-3.

                             

                            Re: #4:  Google has the Android software skills to easily support the e-Ink Nooks;  no device upgrades necessary.  They already have a working app for their own eBooks, and a buy-out of B&N would give them what little source code they needed to adapt (having written almost all of the OS).

                             

                            Re; #5: You're kidding, right?  B&N doesn't have a history of communicating with customers about anything.  No, notice will come first (and only) from Amazon/Google.

                             

                            Re: #6:  For the pre-HD Nooks,  WHEN PIGS FLY.  For the HD Nooks, unnecessary.

                             

                            What I don't understand is how a reasonably-size company like B&N can lose lots of money selling e-Books, if they have no development investment in a device.  They have some past development investment in the Nook GlowLight, but none in the Samsung devices (only inventory, like any other retailer).  Yes, you need some computer overhead for storing the e-Books and associated customer data, plus various eBook reader apps, but I don't see how that amounts to tens of millions, let alone hundreds of millions.  And maybe that is were it will end up:  a small niche competitor (like Kobo) to Amazon.  It could be worse.

                  • Re: B&N Names Frederic Argir As Head of E-Commerce, Nook
                    cmconn

                    This is just so much speculation based on marketing changes. I think moving to the samsung platform was a smart move for nook. You can buy a branded nook or run the nook app on your own tablet. They are probably phasing out desktop support (marketing).

                     

                    I have an HD nook (and my wife has a samsung nook). Both can read nook books, google books and kindle books. I don't think B&N will stop selling their proprietary ebooks, nor will amazon. I can't see them selling non-proprietary ebooks but if they did I would buy them from B&N, read them on whatever tablet I had.